Marge C.'s Story

Georgia – In July 2011 getting ready for my yearly physical and feeling better than I had in a long time, my chest x-ray revealed a spot on my right lung. My doctor quickly followed it up with a CT then more tests, an appointment with a surgeon and on Aug 17, 2011 I was dx (diagnosed) with stage 4 Adenocarcinoma. Here I was 51 years old being told now it was me. Cancer has been in my life since I was a teen, my daddy passed in 1980 of LC then followed my father in law in 2003, my mother in law in (BC) 2007, my brother in 2007 and my Mom in 2010 (She was dx in 1998). I have had many friends fight this battle a few are still fighting. I never thought it would happen to me. Yes, I was a smoker I picked up the habit at 14 when it was the cool thing to do. I had quit over 2 years before dx. It really hurts and angers me to have people assume that I deserve to have this because of smoking. I am sure many things have contributed to my cancer besides smoking. There is always hope. I have been one of the fortunate ones that responds well to chemo. In Jan 2012 my cancer became stable and after completing 18 months of chemo I am presently NED (no evidence of disease). Yay!! A positive attitude is one of the best weapons in this fight. My life has changed. Cancer robbed me and my family of a normal life, stole my energy, emptied our bank account, stripped away those rose colored glasses and in an odd way gave me a better life. Yes, I said gave me a better life. Knowing I have cancer and my time here could end, made me take a long hard look at my life. I have started living and appreciating everyday not just existing. I have made friends with my dust bunnies and found out it is ok to leave the house work. The important things are my family and friends and making as many wonderful and fun memories as we can, because when we are gone that is what we leave behind is memories. I would love to see LUNG CANCER funding and research get more exposure. Most of all I wish ALL CANCERS could be cured and no one ever has to hear…”You have cancer.”

 

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